Wanted: Captain for 19th Century Whaling Ship

J.M. Aucoin . History 1425 No Comments

Chales W. Morgan whaling shipIf you’ve ever dreamed of becoming a captain of your very own sailing vessel, well, you might be in luck.

For the first time in 90 years, Mystic Seaport (Mystic, CT) is looking for a captain for it’s whaling ship, the Charles W. Morgan. The ship has been undergoing a restoration over the past four years. She’s sea-worthy now and the Mystic Seaport is looking for an able captain to take command. From WTNH:

The ideal skipper for the 172-year-old whaleship will have experience with large square rig vessels, but will also be comfortable being the public face of the historic ship. In May the Charles W. Morgan is expected to set sail on a two-month tour taking it to New London, Newport, New Bedford, Martha’s Vineyard, Provincetown, and Boston. It’s first voyage since 1921.

They also need a whole crew for the Charles W. Morgan.

From Mystic Seaport’s website:

The Charles W. Morgan is the “crown jewel” of the Mystic Seaport collection and has outlived all others of her kind. During her 80-year whaling career, the Morgan escaped cannibals and Confederate raiders, and avoided entrapment in the frozen Arctic. In 37 whaling voyages between 1841 and 1921 she survived fire, storms, Cape Horn roundings and, after she finished her whaling career, even the Hurricane of 1938.

The Morgan was launched on July 21, 1841 from the yard of Jethro and Zachariah Hillman in New Bedford, Massachusetts. She typically sailed with a crew of about 35, representing sailors from around the world. The whaleship measures 113 feet, with a 27-foot 6-inch beam and depth of 17 feet 6 inches. Her main truck is 110 feet above the deck; fully-rigged, and she is capable of carrying approximately 13,000 square feet of sail. The huge try-pots used for converting blubber into whale oil are forward; below are the cramped quarters in which her officers and men lived.

I mean… I helped sail the Fame once during a harbor cruise once. And I’m a great fencer to fight off pirates. Does that make me captain material?

J.M. Aucoin

Author. Fencer. Sometimes actor. Full-time nerd. I write swashbucklers & historical adventure novels.
    • Justin

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      I can learn. There’s on the job training, yes?

      Reply

  • lindaj58

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    You look like Captain material to me or at the very least, First Mate!

    Do they by any chance need a photographer and semi-historian? I write one heck of a blog – or two of them actually – and they’re both history-based.

    Oh, and I’ve watched the Fame sail out of Salem Harbor and back in, does that count?? 🙂

    Reply

    • Justin

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      <3

      I do have hours of experience playing Sid Meir's Pirates, so I think that has to count for something.

      What's your blog(s) addies? Would love to check them out.

      Reply

      • Linda

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        I think that virtual experience should definitely count; you could list it as “Extensive training in a state-of-the-art virtual pirate simulator resulting in improved swash-buckling techniques and skills.” 🙂

        I write The Distracted Wanderer which is my own personal travel blog and Travels With Nathaniel which I write as a travel guide for guests and friends of the Hawthorne Hotel in Salem, Massachusetts. Both give me a good reason to traipse around the countryside at every possible opportunity!

        Reply

  • Robert W. Anthony

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    WoW wish I was younger Im 60 I have always wanted to crew on a full square rig sailing ship especially the morgan spent my inlistment in the uscg She is a well built ship and worthy of a good crew I know live in florida I would have given anything to sail on her well mate good luck to ya

    Reply

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